Assignment Helper – Literature Review Matrix

The Literature Review Matrix is intended to be critical exploration and evaluation of scholarly writings on a topic(in this case, your information community). In your formal research paper, the literature review provides context and background for your own study and illustrates how your research will contribute to a particular area of study.This assignment meets the INFO 200’s learning goals #1-3, and will give you experience in synthesizing the articles you have located concerning your community’s information behaviors. You will use this organizational tool to help you prepare for writing the literature review section of your research paper.

View a video about the assignment:

Download the example Literature Review Matrix with three entries:LitReviewMatrix_INFO200EXAMPLE

Getting Started

  • Set aside time for researching your information community. Keep track of your potential sources using your choice of citation manager. Keeping an ongoing APA-formatted bibliography is a tremendous time-saver and helps ensure you properly acknowledge research sources.
  • Visit INFO 200 LibGuide for additional research tips.
  • Review the assignment rubric and requirements.

Determining Appropriate Sources

  • The Literature Review Matrix assignment requires 8 secondary sources about the information needs and information-seeking behaviors of the information community you are researching. The sources must be scholarly, peer reviewed articles or books.  If you are unsure whether a publication is peer reviewed, visit ulrichsweb.com.
  • Consider these questions as overarching guides: What themes of information behavior did you find in your deep dive of the literature? What type of information does your community seek? Where do they look? Where can they find it?
  • While many sources might be useful in the research process to develop your understanding of the topic, the Literature ReviewMatrix is best managed through mindful selection of sources that best answer the aim of the assignment: what are the information behaviors and needs of your chosen community?

Completing the Matrix

  • Download the LitReviewMatrixTemplate_INFO200Rev3 In the first section define/describe your chosen Information Community and explain the significance of studying the information behaviors of this group (e.g. why is this research important). This can be an updated and revised version of your Blog Report #2.
  • For the Statement of Research box, craft a statement regarding your information community and what you want to learn about their information behaviors and needs and how libraries or information centers might provide services to them. For example: The paper based on these articles will demonstrate my understanding of the information behaviors and needs of (your chosen community) and how libraries and information centers might provide or update services to meet their needs. Customize the statement to reflect your information community.
  • Look up one of the articles from the example provided above and give it a quick read and compare what you took away from the reading to the entry in the Matrix.
  • Using the Literature Review Matrix, for each source use one row to provide details about the article (e.g. authors, main ideas, methods, analysis, results, assumptions, conclusions) and your analysis of it (e.g. your conclusions distinct from the authors and the implications you see).
  • Utilize the King Library’s How to Read a Scholarly Article as a guide for filling in the Matrix.
  • Do this for all of your 8 scholarly, peer-reviewed studies, as noted above.  
  • In the final section, list all of your sources included in the Matrix and your description/definition in APA format.

Submitting Your Literature Review Matrix 

  • Submit your assignment by the deadline to the class Canvas (not your blog) by 5pm PT
  • Name your file with your last name/Assignment Name/Date (for example: Ranganathan – Literature Review Matrix – Fall 2019)

 

Here are the three articles covered in the example of the Literature Review Matrix:

Cooke, N. A. (2017). Posttruth, truthiness, and alternative facts: Information behavior and critical information consumption for a new age. Library quarterly: Information, community, policy, 3, 211-221.

Pang, N., & Goh, D. P. C. (2016). Are we all here for the same purpose? social media and individualized collective action. Online Information Review, 40(4), 544-559. http://dx.doi.org.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/10.1108/OIR-10-2015-0337

Tufekci, Z. (2013). “Not this one”: Social movements, the attention economy, and microcelebrity networked activism. American Behavioral Scientist, 57(7), 848-870. doi: 10.1177/0002764213479369