Context Book Review/ Reflective Essay

Description

The Book Review assignment gives you an opportunity to explore literature related to core concepts of our course as well as those related to your community’s creation and use of information. The review will also provide supporting citations for your research paper. Some questions to spur your thinking: How does the book align with our course content, specifically our early readings about information, information behavior and information communities? How might the focus of some titles impact library service? The communities of users we serve? The way we exchange and share information? Consider your choice as a way to explore what might be coming for libraries within the framework of information communities. Look for ways to connect the book to your chosen community and course content.  (Course Learning Outcomes: #1, #2, #3)

Requirements

Students will read one book selected from the list provided below, and write a 750-1000 word reflection relating the topic and focus of the book to libraries or information environments, technology and the focus of our course. Publish the report as a post on your blog. Use images, video, or other media to enhance your artifact. More than one student can select the same title.

Format

Use this assignment to flex your academic writing muscles. Open the post with the book’s citation in standard APA formatting. Provide a brief synopsis and synthesis of main points and then explore the questions above. Include a list of references at the end of your post.

Posting & Submission

Post the finished report to your blog and and also submit the URL of your blog post to Canvas.

The Reading List

The book list for this assignment has been organized into broad topics to assist you in finding a book that relates to the information community you plan on researching. Take some time to explore the titles, look at the descriptions on WorldCat and find a book that looks interesting to you and is applicable to your community.

General Information Science: Choose a book from this section if you are interested in a general information science approach to course themes.

21st Century Information Issues: Choose a book from this section if you are interested in the technological and sociological aspects of information communities. This section also includes issues related to technology and equality, diversity, misinformation, and social justice.

  • Bilton, N. (2010). I live in the future & here’s how it works: Why your world, work, and brain are being creatively disrupted. New York: Crown Business. [WorldCat permalink]
  • Crawford, M. B. (2016). The world beyond your head: On becoming an individual in an age of distraction. [WorldCat Permalink]
  • Harari, Y. N. (2018). 21 lessons for the 21st century. New York: Spiegel & Grau. [WorldCat permalink]
  • Noble, S. U. (2015). The Intersectional Internet: Race, sex, class and culture online. New York: Peter Lang Publishing, Inc. [WorldCat Permalink ]
  • MacKinnon, R. (2012). Consent of the networked: The worldwide struggle for internet freedom. New York, NY: Basic Books. [WorldCat permalink]
  • Kelly, K. (2016). The Inevitable: Understanding the 12 technological forces that will shape our future. New York: Viking. [WorldCat permalink ]
  • Levitin, D. J. (2016). A field guide to lies: Critical thinking in the information age. New York, New York: Dutton. [WorldCat Permalink ]
  • Noble, S. U. (2018). Algorithms of Oppression: How search engines reinforce racism. New York: New York University Press. [WorldCat Permalink ]
  • O’Neil, C. (2016). Weapons of math destruction: How big data increases inequality and threatens democracy. New York: Crown. [WorldCat Permalink ]
  • Shirky, C. (2008). Here comes everybody: The power of organizing without organizations. New York: Penguin Press. [WorldCat permalink]
  • Shirky, C. (2017). Cognitive surplus: Creativity and generosity in a connected age. New York: Riverhead Books. [WorldCat permalink]
  • Sloman, S. & Fernbach, P. (2017). The knowledge illusion: Why we never think alone.New York: Penguin Press. [WorldCat permalink ]
  • Thompson, C. (2013). Smarter than you think: How technology is changing our minds for the better. New York: Penguin Press. [WorldCat permalink ]
  • Turkle, S. (2017). Alone Together: Why we expect more from technology and less from each other. New York: Basic Books. [WorldCat Permalink ]
  • Tufekci, Z. (2017). Twitter and tear gas: The power and fragility of networked protest. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press. [WorldCat Permalink]
  • Weinberger, D. (2011). Too big to know: Rethinking knowledge now that the facts aren’t the facts, experts are everywhere, and the smartest person in the room is the room. New York: Basic Books.  [WorldCat permalink]

Youth: Choose a book from this section if you are interested in how young people use, create and share information.

  • Boyd, D. (2014).It’s complicated: The social lives of networked teens. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press. WorldCat Permalink]
  • Palfrey, J., & Gasser, U. (2018). Born digital: How children grow up in a digital age. Boulder: Basic Books. WorldCat permalink ]

Consumer Behavior: Choose a book from this section if you are interested in how information is shared across communities and platforms.

  • Berger, J. (2013). Contagious: Why things catch on. New York: Simon & Schuster. [WorldCat permalink]
  • Hermida, A. (2014). #tell everyone: Why we share and why it matters. Toronto: Doubleday Canada. [WorldCat permalink]

Information Environments: Choose a book from this section if you are interested in information communities in related institutions or environments.

  • Simon, N. (2016). The art of relevance. Santa Cruz: Museum 2.0. [WorldCat permalink]
  • Hermida, A. (2014). #tell everyone: Why we share and why it matters. Toronto: Doubleday Canada. [WorldCat permalink ]
  • Markova, D., & McArthur, A. (2015). Collaborative intelligence: Thinking with people who think differently. New York: Spiegel & Grau. [WorldCat Permalink]

Privacy Issues: Choose a book from this section if you are interested in the impact of current and emerging information environments on privacy and the self.

  • Howard, Philip N. (2015). Pax Technica; how the Internet of things may set us free or lock us up. New Haven:Yale University Press. [WorldCat permalink]
  • Jasanoff, S. (2016). The ethics of invention: Technology and the human future. New York: W.W. Norton & Company. [WorldCat Permalink]
  • Jones, M. L. (2018). Ctrl + Z : the right to be forgotten. New York: New York University Press. [WorldCat Permalink]

Critical thinking/Evaluating information:  Choose a book from this section if you are interested how communities interact with information, facts, and sharing.

  • Levitin, D. J. (2016). A field guide to lies: Critical thinking in the information age. New York, New York: Dutton. [WorldCat Permalin ]
  • Hermida, A. (2014). #tell everyone: Why we share and why it matters. Toronto: Doubleday Canada. [WorldCat permalink]
  • Klosterman, C. (2016). But what if we’re wrong? Thinking about the present as if it were the past. New York: Penguin Random House. [WorldCat Permalink)]
  • Rosling, H. (2019). Factfulness: Ten reasons we’re wrong about the world and why things are better than you think. New York: Flatiron Books. WorldCat Permalink

Sample Reviews:

Consent of the Networkedhttps://infocom.hyperlib.sjsu.edu/book-review/book-review-not-one-size-fits-all-privacy-and-access-for-diverse-information-communities/

The Information: https://infocom.hyperlib.sjsu.edu/book-review/tidal-wave-a-book-review-of-the-information-by-james-gleick/

Smarter Than You Think: How Technology Is Changing Our Minds for the Betterhttps://infocom.hyperlib.sjsu.edu/book-review/book-review-smarter-than-you-think/

Twitter and Teargas: The Power and Fragility of Networked Protesthttps://infocom.hyperlib.sjsu.edu/book-review/book-review-twitter-and-teargas-the-power-and-fragility-of-networked-protest/

But What if We’re Wrong? Thinking About the Present as if it Were the Pasthttps://infocom.hyperlib.sjsu.edu/book-review/book-review-but-what-if-were-wrong-thinking-about-the-present-as-if-it-were-the-past/

Field Guide to Lies TerriFieldGuidetoLiesBookReport2019

Context Book Rubric
Criteria Description Pts
Professional Presentation
Makes effective use of blog post format including images and links.
 2 pts
Organization and Clarity
Demonstrates critical thinking and depth of analysis related to the focus of the book. Presents ideas with a logical flow and quality outline.
 3 pts
Connections to Course Content and Information Science
Reflects on the book through the lens of INFO 200 course content and clearly cites course materials to support ideas and connections.
 3 pts
Mechanics
Exhibits expertise in academic writing skills, consistently utilizing appropriate grammar and APA citation style.
 2 pts
Total Points: 10