Choosing Your Community Discussion

  • Hi @michael, I am interested in studying birders as an information community. I am not entirely sure there is enough literature on this specific community- though there sure is plenty on birds. Would information on other groups such as outdoor enthusiasts or hobbyists be applicable? I feel like there is more that I could utilize.

    • @amberantonison I would say birders would fall into the serious leisure area (take a look at the article I’ve shared down below – it’s also in the next module). Yes studies of the information behaviors of outdoor enthusiast would work as would LIS studies on hobbyist in general. Serious Leisure would be a good framework to start with.

  • Hi @michael, I am interested in looking into hate groups as an information community. Do you think this could work as a topic, or should I focus in on a specific group within this fairly broad designation? What general information I have found tends to focus towards white supremacist groups as a matter of course.

    • @jas12695 A timely and unsettling example of an information community. I would go broadly and then pull examples from specific groups to demonstrate info behaviors. Perhaps take a look at Jason’s assignment synthesis – activists. There might be some similar group behaviors. This is important and I think it would be good to see what’s out there.…[Read more]

  • Hi @michael, I initially wanted to focus my efforts on online gaming communities (any platform), but utilizing multiple databases through the King Library, there just wasn’t enough research done to inform the topic. I then decided to focus on the homeless adult community, as it is one of the largest communities in my area that my library…[Read more]

    • @poblete7257 hey there – if you are interested in focusing on gamers, it should work. I have had successful papers focused on studies of information exchange in virtual communities (that fits) as well as studies of game players. You might want to contact our King Library librarians for assistance. Details on their contact info…[Read more]

  • Hi, I’m thinking of choosing high school aged teens, but wasn’t sure if that is too broad? Specifically, I’m trying to understand how teens communicate, and how adults are using communication methods that they don’t respond to (like email). I was going to read Born Digital for my book review. I’m also volunteering in the Berkeley High (over 3000…[Read more]

    • Hi there, @michael. After much consideration, I have chosen to research Vinyl Communities. I have done some preliminary research and have been able to find a lot of information, including Peer Review articles on Vinyl Communities. In addition, I have chosen the Art of Relevance by Nina Simon to use for my Book Review and think the book and…[Read more]

      • Hi @lbarker – do you mean folks that collect vinyl LPs? This sounds good and it will fall into the serious leisure area. The articles you found – are they from LIS journals, looking at info behaviors? The Simon book sounds like a good fit too.

        • Hi @michael, yes a Vinyl Collector Community. I was able to find several LIS Peer Reviewed Articles from the One Search with Keyword “Vinyl Collectors” and “Information Behaviors”. What do mean serious leisure area? Is this topic not scholarly enough? I think it could be a really cool way to connect collectors overall, but also connect them to…[Read more]

          • @lbarker Oh no – it is an excellent community to look at! I was mentioning an article from Mod 4 about Serious Leisure Info behavior theory. From the piece: “According to Hektor, there are four general modes of information behaviour, shown at the centre of the figure: seeking, gathering, communicating and giving. The modes manifest as eight i…[Read more]

            • @michael Gotcha, I understand now and agree that my information community fits into the serious leisure model. Thanks for the article. Very interesting to see how the leisure perspective can expand the discussion to not just behaviors and how users search for information, but also how they use, create, and share information. I will definitely…[Read more]

            • @lbarker Cool! Next week, we cover that article and others in the second part of info behavior. All may be useful!

  • Hi @michael! I am still doing some preliminary research on two groups that I am thinking about choosing as my information community. I just want to make sure there are enough sources for me to be able to work with. I like the idea of researching a fan group for my information community, and am thinking about Disney fans as possibility. This could…[Read more]

    • @msmelissa52 I would suggest choosing the one that has the prevalent amount of LIS literature focused on the information seeking and behaviors of your group. The Disney angle could pull from studies of fan info behavior and fan communities. For commuters, if the sources you found are LIS studies, that’s great! Let me know.

  • @michael As I mentioned in the discussion this morning, I would like to research the information communities of automobile enthusiasts. My preliminary questions are: where do they find information about their hobby, how do they share information, and how do libraries support their hobby?

  • I’ve been a little bit stuck on my community. I’ve been thinking of a few things, but one of the ones that’s stuck with me is LGBTQ+ youth. I’ve run into a couple of thoughts about this, though. 1) Should I distill this down further to look at information seeking behaviors of LGBTQ+ youth in regards to health, and 2) is this community too…[Read more]

    • @leeknight I think this is a good choice. I would suggest starting broadly and then highlighting health info seeking as a section in your lit review and/or discussion. You can pull lit related to LGBTQ+ youth specifically as well as youth in general…and health info seeking too!

  • @michael I am thinking about focusing on the community of expectant/new parents. In addition to the information sources like medical websites available, there seem to be quite a few interesting “information grounds” like Facebook, church groups, message boards, etc

    • @laurazupan I would agree. The LIS literature related to health information seeking would apply here as well as specific studies on how expectant/new parents find info. Good point about information grounds.

  • @michael Right now I’m fascinated by the community of senior and middle aged seekers of AV materials, especially movies. From what I can tell, they account for a huge proportion of circulation at public libraries. I have a particular interest in looking at the “cloud divide” (I don’t know if anyone else has used that term), i.e. the differences…[Read more]

    • @mjulrich This is an interesting one. I would wonder if the LIS research has covered this angle. It might be worth it to do some preliminary searches in the King Library databases. It might be a matter of melding studies of cord cutters with studies of info seeking behaviors of seniors. I agree with your thought about unwieldy – it might prove to…[Read more]

  • @michael I am thinking about Seniors and their needs with technology in the library. I work in a Tech Center where I often have to instruct this community on “basic” tech knowledge. Is this too narrow and should broaden it to seniors and their needs in the library?

    • @mwieler This is a good choice. It would be the information behaviors and needs of seniors – not just in the library setting. I think you will find useful LIS research.

  • I’m thinking I might focus on the information needs and information-seeking behaviors of adults with dyslexia. Would such a group include only individuals diagnosed with this condition? Or could it also include individuals without the condition but with an interest in seeking out information for or about the condition. I’m thinking tutors,…[Read more]

    • @teresachung Good question. I think the information community could be broader than just those with dyslexia. You will pull from the area of health information seeking for sure – I know there is some interesting literature there.

      • @michael Quick question. How will you be delivering your feedback on our blog posts?
        I also wanted to share that it’s been interesting to look over some of the choices and descriptions posted by my classmates. In particular, some have highlighted different portions of the Fisher and Bishop reading, making me go back to it again. This has proved…[Read more]

  • I am interested in Young Adults as my Information Community. Quick question: Should I narrow my community even further? Some ideas: smaller age range, geographical group, first generation US residents, or socio-economic category? Any thoughts are appreciate. Thanks!

    • @ackaufman I think Young Adults is fine. You could highlight more specific sub-groups as you find LIS studies about them, but it might be best to stay broad. Check out the Born Digital and It’s Complicated books as well.

  • I feel a pull to both homeless persons and social movements within technology. I feel a personal pull to homeless persons because of experience through family but also social movements because it is such big topic, especially in today’s world. I’m not sure which one I really want to do. Maybe somehow I can incorporate both? (Just thinking out loud)

    • @vanessamarie Totally cool to think out loud. I have had successful papers on both groups. I don’t know what might be out there about both, but you could pull together LIS lit about each specific group and see what that looks like.

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