Syllabus

The full syllabus for our sections of INFO 200 is here:

https://sjsu.campusconcourse.com/view_syllabus?course_id=761&public_mode=1

Course Description

INFO 200 examines information users and the social, cultural, economic, technological, and political forces that shape their information access and use. The course also addresses the different resources and services that information professionals provide for their user communities, as well as ethical/legal professional practice

Ultimately users are at the heart of all libraries and information services, so INFO 200 focuses outward on the very people librarians and information professionals serve: those who are creating, using, and sharing information. Framing the course as outward-facing embraces a forward-thinking and beneficial perspective for graduates and information professionals to conceptualize both their own roles and the potential of the LIS profession. This course will help prepare you to proactively and intentionally engage with the patrons they serve through examining information communities in a broader context of information behavior and the social, cultural, economic, technological, and political forces that shape information access and use.

From The Encyclopedia of Community (2003), Joan Durrance and Karen Fisher’s definitive entry provides a theoretical framework: information communities promote a common interest around creation and exchange of distributed information; may be built around different focal points and topics; can emerge and function without geographical boundaries; and often exploit the Internet and technology. Each module explores these ideas of information communities and how libraries and information organizations can support diverse communities and see the individuals they serve not just as information consumers, but as seekers, creators and collaborators.

INFO 200 Information Communities is designed to leverage your work throughout the semester in order to ensure a successful, culminating research paper at term’s end. Students will be asked to identify an information community that librarians and information centers serve and as the semester progresses, the blog posts and the larger written assignments will focus on your community’s information behaviors and needs and guide your research and writing.

Course Learning Outcomes

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to:

  1. Define the concept of community within a framework of information creation, use, and exchange.
  2. Locate, synthesize, and properly cite research and professional literature relating to specific information communities.
  3. Describe the various theories and research devoted to information use and behavior.
  4. Articulate prominent issues related to diversity, special populations, and emerging technologies within the context of various information communities/environments.
  5. Identify various resources and services that information professionals utilize to serve their communities.
  6. Explain how libraries and information centers create and offer learning opportunities related to specific information communities.
  7. Identify ways in which information professionals serve specific information communities in a global context.
  8. Identify and describe current and emerging technologies that impact the creation, use, and exchange of information within communities.
  9. Create and deliver high quality reflections on course themes across open social platforms via various media: text, audio, video.

Core Competencies

INFO 200 supports the following core competencies:

  • C Recognize the diversity (such as cultural and economic) in the clientele and employees of an information organization and be familiar with actions the organization should take to address this diversity.
  • F Use the basic concepts and principles related to the selection, evaluation, organization, and preservation of physical and digital information items.
  • H Demonstrate proficiency in identifying, using, and evaluating current and emerging information and communication technologies.
  • J Describe the fundamental concepts of information-seeking behaviors.
  • K Design collaborative/individual learning experiences based on learning principles and theories.
  • L Demonstrate understanding of quantitative and qualitative research methods, the ability to design a research project, and the ability to evaluate and synthesize research literature.
  • M Demonstrate oral and written communication skills necessary for professional work including collaboration and presentations.
  • O (for students entering from Spring 2015) identify ways in which information professionals can contribute to the cultural, economic, educational, and social well-being of our global communities.